substance


For my dad, for his birthday meal.
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The pierogies came out so great! I added some buckwheat into the beet/sauerkraut filling and some kale and baby spinach to the onion topping.
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Seriously, make them!
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For the cake, I veganized the recipe for mai tai chocolate cake from Death By Chocolate Cake, by Marcel Desaulniers.
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It had a lot of components going on (pineapple-almond layer cake, chocolate rum mousse, orange buttercream, chocolate orange ganache, and last but not least chocolate dipped/almond covered dried pineapple slices), but I made them all over a few days, and it came together quite easily.

There were a lot of textures going on, but I mean that in the best way possible. It was extremely satisfying and rich.

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I made the orange buttercream with coconut oil, and I was super happy with how it came out. Also, the orange zest flecked throughout looked so adorable.
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Both are going into my “Absolutely must make again!!!” file.

If you’re like me, you can never have enough cookbooks in your collection.
The Best of Bloodroot (note: there are two volumes, I haven’t made anything from vol. 1 yet, so this post is only about vol. 2) is now up there in my favorites (along with The Passionate Vegetarian and Vegetarian Cooking for Everyone, if you were wondering), but I’m sorry to say that until my friend/boss Lagusta gave me a copy of the book, I had never even heard of Bloodroot. As a vegetarian feminist collective, they blend politics and food together seamlessly, and they’re an inspiration to all.
What I especially love about this cookbook is the fact that there is a conscious decision to move away from Earth Balance and other unsustainable products we sometimes become accustomed to.
The majority of the recipes are also soymilk free, replacing soy with coconut, which leads to amazing texture and richness, and is also very nice for people looking to cut down on their consumption of soy. (Lagusta has an amazing essay on coconut in the beginning of the book, definitely check it out!!!)

But enough of the raving, I’ll let the pictures do the talking.

Winter Miso Soup

Winter Miso Soup

Chinese Steamed Buns

Chinese Steamed Buns

Seaweed and Bean Thread Noodle Salad with Avocado

Seaweed and Bean Thread Noodle Salad with Avocado

Shiitake Soup

Shiitake Soup

Estofado Con Chochoyotes

Estofado Con Chochoyotes

Parsnip (in place of pumpkin) Tofu Custard with Caramelized Pears

Parsnip (in place of pumpkin) Tofu Custard with Caramelized Pears

Chocolate Ice Cream with Hot Fudge Sauce

Chocolate Ice Cream with Hot Fudge Sauce

Banana Cream Pie!

Banana Cream Pie!

Half-Eaten Banana Cream Pie

Half-Eaten Banana Cream Pie

Slice of Banana Cream Pie

Slice of Banana Cream Pie

Go buy it!

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I don’t hate Swiss chard, but I don’t count the old chard as a favorite among my leafy green friends, so when I had a ton of it to use up in my fridge, rather than go the boring route of sauteing, I figured why not make pesto out of it?
It was promptly blanched and shocked, then tossed (well, not really tossed, but you know what I mean…) into the food processor with lemon zest, extra virgin olive oil, walnuts, and salt and pepper whilst the alphabets were cooking, and a good meal was had by all.

Although I must say, the alphabets had some serious letter ratio problems, with most of the pasta shapes being P’s, B’s, or R’s.
A-Z my arse.

Dear pasta company,
If you’re going to have alphabet shaped pasta, please have the whole alphabet so I can spell out big words (my parents never told me not to play with my food- actually, my dad did, but I didn’t listen) and not just the initials for Pabst Blue Ribbon beer.

Thanks,
Veronica

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Flea markets are good ideas, that pretty much goes without saying. Although don’t you hate it when a flea market looks like it’s going to be really great and it’s really crappy and thus a major letdown? For the most part, the Woodstock flea market is crappy (that is, if you share my taste in all things art, fashion, etc).
However, if you ever find yourself at the Mower’s Market be sure to hunt down Marlene, she’s awesome and has super awesome stuff. My flapper hat is a Marlene find from a few years ago. Shall we take a moment to reflect on the radness?:

Good idea: Make food for your favorite vendor because she’s your favorite vendor and you like making food for people. Because your mother is part Italian, definitely go overboard.
White bean and roasted tomato galette:

Allspice roasted butternut squash:

Sauteed kale + shallots:

Mediterranean spelt salad:

Mostly every other vendor sells, well, Woodstock-y stuff, which is fine if you learn to except it for what it is and only take the quickest glance at it. There are some exceptions to this rule, though. See below.

Good idea:
Always, always, always take a quick glance around the whole market, even if you’re itching to get to the Woodstock Library Sale. Score boxfuls of vintage hats for $5 each! Ignore obnoxious people who take interest in said hats only after you start looking at them.

Add to your ever growing collection of hats.

Oy, I’ll have you know that was a low point for my room. It looks a lot better now, thanks.
Also, that’s not how you should store your hats, don’t follow my example.
Also, that’s not even a quarter of the hats I own. I should just open up a store already.